Taba's exceptional geographical location between Africa and Asia at the tip of the Gulf of Aqaba facing Saudi Arabia made it a stopover on the caravan route from the 14th century onwards. Today, Taba is a flourishing touristic destination for guests from around the world in search for pristine beaches and exceptional coral reefs to explore.

This is no surprise with its warm winter sun and temperatures reaching 22°C; in summer the dry climate makes the heat pleasant and the average is 33°C.

But there's more to Taba than the common sea and sun resort/diving vacation, the nearby Sinai landmarks are must-sees, and they're all only a couple of hours away. Be sure that the impressive coloured canyon, the inspiring St. Catherine's Monastery and the massive Saladin fortress are all worth an escape from your resort activities.

Marsa Matrouh

Nestled inside a big circular bay and protected from the high seas by a series of rocks forming a natural breakwater, Marsa Matrouh is a relatively secluded destination on Egypt’s Mediterranean shore. It is the capital of the Matrouh Governorate, which extends from the 61st km of the Alexandria-Matrouh highway to the Egypt-Libyan border (450 km of coast), from East to West, and from the coast 350 km deep into the western desert of Egypt, including Siwa Oasis.

With long sandy white beaches and crystal clear waters, such as Agiba Beach and Gharam Beach, described by many as one of the most beautiful seashore landscapes in the world, many believe that Cleopatra herself bathed in the tranquil waters of Marsa Matrouh. The reputed spot, Cleopatra’s Beach, is still accessible and you surely won't miss it during your visit. The coastal Mediterranean climate lends this town its moderation in summer and the cold in winter. The best times to visit are in May and September.
The water’s colour ranges from blue to green, due to the depths differences in Matrouh’s bay. The irregular sea ground forms an amazing underwater world of mountains, valleys and colourful fish species.

Marsa Matrouh is in the north-western corner of Egypt where Erwin Rommel, the desert fox himself, picked a cave near the shore to command operations during the Battle of El-Alamein. Rommel’s cave’s still there, it has been transformed into a "Rommel Museum" which you can visit today.

Marsa Matrouh's average temperature can reach highs of 28 C in summer and lows of 13 C in winter.


Famed for the decisive victory of the Allies over the Axis forces in the WWII North Africa campaign, El-Alamein is located half-way between Alexandria and Marsa Matrouh on the Egyptian North Coast. Today, it is home to war memorials, the British Memorial, the German Memorial and the Italian Memorial, as well as cemeteries, and landmarks reminiscent of this important part of the town’s history.

What's not to forget is that El-Alamein was also once described by Churchill himself as having the best climate in the world! It has thus normally become the favourite sun and sand upscale destination of Egyptian tourists on the White Med, and foreigners are following the trend and invading the upscale resorts that are growing like mushrooms on this stretch of coastal paradise. The temperature in the summer months ranges between 22 and 30°C while the winter average is 17°C.

In Graeco-Roman times, El-Alamein was known as “Locassis”, which means the white shell; it has been so named because of its beautiful white sandy beaches. Aphrodite, the goddess of love, was worshipped there. Today, you can bask in total luxury on the sandy white beaches of El-Alamein .

Frequent charter flights operate from main European cities to the fairly newly built El-Alamein International Airport.


Famous for being called the "Pearl of the Mediterranean,” the captivating Alexandria will fascinate you with its mix of history and modernity. Although very little remains of the old city, Alexandria still retains its Mediterranean ambience and old European residence houses, combined with old cafes and Greco Roman monuments. The Catacombs of Kom el-Shouqafa, the underwater ruins of Montazah and Maamoura and the city’s vibrant arts scene make Alexandria a great sightseeing destination. Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi Mosque and the Coptic Cathedral of St. Mark are also sights to behold.

The beauty and cosmopolitanism of Alexandria inspired great authors such as the British novelist E.M. Forster, the Greek poet Constantine Cavafy who respectively lived in Alexandria in the early and late 19th century, and Lawrence Durrell who lived and wrote about the city during World War II.

The Alexandrian coastline extends on no less than 70 km, from the north-western side of the Nile delta to Mariout Lake in the east. The coast is dotted with beautiful bays and harbours, such as Abu-Qir and the crescent-shaped Alexandrian Eastern Harbour which is overlooked by the majestic Qaitbay Fortress.
The Cornice in Alexandria is a treat during both summer and winter. Starting from Ras El Tin and stretching all the way to Montazah you can enjoy spectacular view of the White Mediterranean. The Cornice was developed in the 1930s and further developments were made to it in the early 1990s. Beaches stretch along the coast from Maamoura in the east and all the way to the Agamy beach west of Alexandria.

If you have time, do not forget to explore the nearby destinations of Borg El-Arab (where the main airport is located) and Abu-Mina. Both are about 50 km away from the city and home to interesting historical sites (St. Mena Monastery, and the Roman Necropolis in Borg El-Arab) and touristic resorts (the Hilton Borg El-Arab, and Golden Beach).

The temperate Mediterranean climate in Alexandria insures cooler summers and warmer winters than in other parts of Egypt. While winters are mostly rainy with temperatures ranging between 10 and 20°C, summers are renowned for the refreshing sea breeze, with temperatures between 22 and 34°C


The very small village of Abu-Simbel lies 280 km south of Aswan, and only 40 km north of the Sudanese border.
Even though it is home to several hotels, the small town is usually overlooked by tourists as a holiday destination. Most of them prefer to visit the Nubian town on a daytrip from Cairo or Aswan or as an extension to a Nile cruise or a Lake Nasser Cruise.
Perched atop a hill overlooking the Nile, the majestic Abu-Simbel Temples are a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dedicated to Ramses II & Nefertari, the world-famed temples will take your breath away. After a visit to this inspiring site, you can walk around the colourful touristic market, go bird watching on the Lake Nasser, and get back to the temples again in the evening for the amazingly inspiring sound & light show.
Staying in Abu-Simbel for a night or two will allow you to enjoy the peace and magic of this Nubian town at your own pace and discover the true spirit of Abu-Simbel, gaze at the magnificent statues for hours and avoid the hordes of tourists arriving usually in the early morning. You’ll also get a glimpse of the hearty Nubian culture by listening to Nubian music, meeting with the locals, and maybe even escaping to the nearby desert for some more inspiring experiences.


Located about 899 km south from Cairo, Aswan is a serene Nile Valley destination where the Nile is more majestic than anywhere else, flowing through granite rocks, and round emerald islands covered in palm groves and tropical plants. It is considered as an all-time favourite winter destination.
Moreover, you'll be surprised to see how many monuments and sites this small city has to offer. Consider sailing to the temple of Philae, seeing the Agha Khan Mausoleum and taking an excursion to St. Simeon’s Monastery.
Egypt's sunniest southern city is the perfect destination to stroll and relax in a magical cultural setting: wander down the broad walkway, locally known as the corniche, to watch feluccas slowly sailing the Nile then stop at one of the floating restaurants to enjoy Nubian music and freshly caught fish. Aswan offers a splendid view of the Nile and is a great starting point for a Nile cruise.

Aswan also offers a rich cultural experience; you’ll get to know Nubian culture and shop for spices, henna tattoos, souvenirs and African handmade goods at the Aswan souk. The word Aswan derives in fact from the Ancient Egyptian word “Soun” meaning souk or trade. It has earned its name thanks to the city’s strategic position, on the trade route linking the North of Egypt to its South.

Since Ancient times, Aswan has also been known for its environmental therapy: burying the aching parts of your body in Aswan’s sand gives valuable results and can help relieving you from stubborn ailments such as rheumatism, arthritis, joint edema and skin inflammation. The town’s climate is also known to have great relaxing and rejuvenating properties.
The best times to visit Aswan are May and September, summers are scorching, and winter temperatures have been known to reach 27 during the day, with cold nights.


Luxor, once an Ancient Egyptian capital, is known today as the world's "greatest open-air museum." From the tomb of Tutankhamen in the Valley of the Kings and the magnificent sunset views at the majestic temple complexes of Karnak and Luxor to the exciting and fun Nile cruises, Luxor is the perfect choice for culture vultures.

Luxor is divided by the Nile into two areas commonly called the East Bank and West Bank which were considered in Ancient Egyptian times as symbolizing respectively Life and Death.

While the East Bank has grown to become a modern city, it has retained its lush green setting, its traditional bazaar and stunning view of the Nile. The East Bank boasts some of Egypt's most refined hotels, home to amazing Spa's and a golf course.
The West Bank is known for its necropolis and mortuary temples: the Valley of the Kings, the Valley of the Queens, the Workers Village, and the Temple of Medinet Habu are the highlights of Luxor’s West Bank. In Ancient Egyptian mythology the setting sun to the west symbolised the journey to the afterlife, so it was fitting symbolism to bury the dead west of the Nile.

While in Luxor, you can opt for a simple accommodation at one of the simple hotel of the West Bank, where archaeologists used to stay when on excavations missions, or you can take it to the other extreme by staying at one of the town’s luxurious establishments, such as the El-Moudira Hotel on the West Bank or the history-filled Old Winter Palace on the East Bank.

Sun and warmth all year round characterizes Luxor’s climate, the sun shines for 11 hours during summer and 8 during winter. Winter temperature averages around 26°C, in summer temperature reaches 39°C